Project Description

Dr. Steven Nakisher is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist, founder of the Center for Personal Development and co-founder of Cornerpiece Consulting. Dr. Nakisher received his undergraduate degree from the University of Michigan and completed his doctorate degree at the Chicago School of Professional Psychology.

Areas of Focus:

Dr. Nakisher has a distinctive background working with individuals across the lifespan providing therapy and consultation to individuals, couples, groups, leaders and teams.

Areas of expertise include working with adults who struggle with identity, relationships, substance abuse and/or addictions, often co-occurring within the context of depression, anxiety, grief and loss or other deeper challenges of personality.

Philosophy:

Dr. Nakisher’s approach can be best described as “get out of your own way” therapy.

You are the common denominator in all of your life experiences. Regardless of the role you’ve played, it’s likely time to get out of your own way and live a more authentic, productive and fulfilling life. You deserve it.

I have a tremendous respect for how life’s challenges are experienced and managed. The struggle is real. However, I’ve learned that sometimes the challenges that feel the most complicated often feel that way because of the meanings we’ve associated and the methods by which we’ve coped. It’s the ritualized patterns that find us feeling misunderstood, underappreciated, and stuck, that need to be addressed.

Getting Unstuck

There is nothing worse than feeling stuck.  We experience this phenomenon at work and in our relationships.  We try to fix the discomfort by changing jobs, changing our relationships and it doesn’t work.  Ironically, despite making changes, we don’t feel changed. The immobility lies not in these situations, but within our own psychology… our internal world.

It’s external change we want.  It’s internal change we need.

Being stuck is normal and necessary.  In fact, this phenomena holds the magical DNA of change and growth.  Coming out or breaking through it is however, an inside job.

If we can reframe feeling stuck as an opportunity (rather than a problem),  we change our familiar-dead end paths. Then, we can embark upon an important, explorative journey that will likely be both exciting and scary.  Discomfort (not the safety of comfort) will be your guide.

Think about it this way…

While our shame and fear are often our greatest barriers, they also protect us.  Unfortunately, they impact our ability to address what’s driving our experience.  So, rather than running away, maybe it is time to face it and deal with it. It’s one thing to be self-aware.  It’s another to know what to do with it.

Get in your own way to get out of your own way.

Getting out of your own way means stepping inside of yourself and  creating personal accountability. This will empower you to name, own and work through personal barriers of denial, resistance, shame, projection and  worry. The result is that you can and will find relevance and meaning.

Easier said than done.

You are real.  Your thoughts often are not.

Don’t believe everything  you think. Stop focusing on explaining or being a right fighter, you’re just limiting  your ability to explore, learn, and grow.

Our basic worries are simply patterns that we allow to re-appear in new forms over and over throughout our lives so that we don’t have to take action when we may really need to.

Together, we’ll figure it out.

We can’t all do it alone…for when we try, we fall prisoner to our internal and awful feedback loops…grounded in our history.

Having someone to remind us, until we  can remind ourselves, that our intrusive thoughts are simply that. Intrusive.  They are not kind. They are not reality.

I’m here.  I’m an honest, forthright, compassionate and caring professional that can help you create the healthy space between impulsive reactions and responsive actions.

The Therapeutic Relationship

Woven through the fabric of the therapeutic relationship is a dynamic approach that is supportive and direct within the context of a safe space to explore meaning, while confronting issues that may impair or enhance quality of day-to day-living.

I believe the relational process supports working through the complexity together, while providing opportunity for the client to get out of their own way, revealing solutions of mind, body and behavior.

Change, grief and loss and perceptions of failure, are each a promise in life. Each play  an important role in working through different phases, helping us get to the next step. Yet all too often, we allow these challenges to negatively impact our feelings of self-worth and effectiveness.  When embraced, we create rich opportunities for growth.

In order to live one’s best self within one’s best life, we fool ourselves into believing that we have to always be, “happy.”  Well, I say it’s about figuring out what is personally meaningful. With this defined and serving as your North Star, creating a better version of yourself is more realistic and fulfilling.

I tend to think that once you’ve identified and committed to more meaning in your life, becoming more authentic is a natural process.

The therapeutic relationship supports the acceptance of your life as it really is and of you as you really are.  This is what people mean when they say, “Be your best self.” Your “best” self is you, as you really are, in the here and now.

I work with all clients in ways that are unique to the individual.  Serving as an interested, supportive and caring professional, my goal is to help you see and experience yourself and yourself in relation, in ways that will lead to making decisions and taking actions toward a healthier and more meaningful life.

“You will either step forward into growth or you will step into safety.” –    – – Abraham Maslow

Accomplishments:

  • Doctor of Psychology and Licensed Clinical Psychologist
  • Member American Psychologist Association (APA)
  • Member American Group Psychotherapy Association (AGPA)
  • Certified Group Psychotherapist (AGPA)
  • Member Illinois Psychologist Association (IPA)
  • Board Member: Chicago School of Professional Psychology (2001-present)
  • University of Illinois Chicago Liautaud Graduate School of Business: PDEI Certified